Brainstorming about the Future of Computers and Writing (And Documenting the Process)

I was just recently invited to participate in a panel tentatively title “The Future of Computers and Writing” at this summer’s Computers & Writing conference in West Lafayette. Should be a blast. I know most of the other panelists and they are fantastic people. We’re all graduate students. The panel is officially something like 48 hours old at this point, so who knows what we’ll be specifically talking about. We’ll be working that out amongst ourselves over the next several weeks, I guess.

So this morning I sat down to start brainstorming for how I might contribute to the panel, or maybe think of some questions to get a conversation started between us. Per my usual practice, I started my brainstorming session with a mindmapping program called MindManager. But before I started, I thought “I should just blog about this. That might be cool.” Then I populated a couple of the text bubbles on my map, and thought "I should screencast this!” So there you have it. And so I did it. Here it is… (You can make the video larger by clicking on it and going to YouTube. Or you can download it to your desktop, too.)

Haven’t really reflected much yet on this strategy, but my first impulse is that I like it. Maybe I’ll write a post reflecting on using emerging digital tools to document the writing process (and why the hell anyone would want to do that). Or maybe about how this video demonstrates a relatively novel way of brainstorming. (Eventually almost all writing practices will be considered novel, as available tools and practices proliferate, right? Maybe. Another post?)

And a couple quick mentions before I check out. First, in the spirit of citation and remix, I’ve made a downloadable version of the video available. Please feel free to remix, cite, share, repost, etc. (Just remember to follow the guidelines of the creative commons license under which all content on this blog falls.) This post makes me wish I had access to some digital object identifiers which would help encourage citation. Maybe that’ll be another post, too.

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Brainstorming about the Future of Computers and Writing (And Documenting the Process)

I was just recently invited to participate in a panel tentatively title “The Future of Computers and Writing” at this summer’s Computers & Writing conference in West Lafayette. Should be a blast. I know most of the other panelists and they are fantastic people. We’re all graduate students. The panel is officially something like 48 hours old at this point, so who knows what we’ll be specifically talking about. We’ll be working that out amongst ourselves over the next several weeks, I guess.

So this morning I sat down to start brainstorming for how I might contribute to the panel, or maybe think of some questions to get a conversation started between us. Per my usual practice, I started my brainstorming session with a mindmapping program called MindManager. But before I started, I thought “I should just blog about this. That might be cool.” Then I populated a couple of the text bubbles on my map, and thought "I should screencast this!” So there you have it. And so I did it. Here it is… (You can make the video larger by clicking on it and going to YouTube. Or you can download it to your desktop, too.)

Haven’t really reflected much yet on this strategy, but my first impulse is that I like it. Maybe I’ll write a post reflecting on using emerging digital tools to document the writing process (and why the hell anyone would want to do that). Or maybe about how this video demonstrates a relatively novel way of brainstorming. (Eventually almost all writing practices will be considered novel, as available tools and practices proliferate, right? Maybe. Another post?)

And a couple quick mentions before I check out. First, in the spirit of citation and remix, I’ve made a downloadable version of the video available. Please feel free to remix, cite, share, repost, etc. (Just remember to follow the guidelines of the creative commons license under which all content on this blog falls.) This post makes me wish I had access to some digital object identifiers which would help encourage citation. Maybe that’ll be another post, too.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *