Site Redesign

Maybe you’ve noticed. Maybe this is your first time here. Either way, I’ve gotta tell you how pumped I am about this latest site-redesign. Whooo Hooo!
So first, let me admit that it doesn’t have the same sort of emo-edgar-allan-punk feel that the “black” design had. But I was having some trouble with the site. The white on black text was just too contrasty for me. I’d be reading something, and then look away to a word processing document or something, and I’d still be able to see the image-negative of the text block I’d just read. Not good. Weird and uncomfortable. And I’d also been experimenting with the fonts. Started with an Arial family for most of the black-site’s life, but recently changed to a serif font, Times New Roman. I liked the formality, but it didn’t seem any easier to read. And the font was too small, too. But there were two things that really sold me on that design (Sliding Doors, by Wayne Conner): 1) the sliding image menu at the top of the main page, and 2) the way that pictures really pop off a black ground. I managed to keep the sliding menu with the new design, though.
Have I been thinking about this too much? Maybe. Here’s a list of what I’ve done with this new design:
The background is white. A lot of what I’m trying to think about with this blog is the cultural transition from print-privilege to screen-privilege. The white ground seems a little more familiar. More traditional. There’s going to be plenty that isn’t, so at least there’s something that harkens back to print.
The font is Century Gothic. Cool, eh? I’m not sure if this element is gonna stick, but I really like how clean it is. I’ve read alot about fonts over the years. I’ve always thought that serif fonts are supposed to be easier to read because the serifs visually implied a horizontal line which speeds reading and is more comfortable for the eye. Maybe so. But then I’ve read in quite a few places online that this phenomenon just doesn’t hold true on screens. The resolution of a screen, though improving, is still no where near the fidelity of print type. So the serifs end up doing more harm than good in terms of speed and eye strain. I also just like how simple and clean Century Gothic looks. I think it creates sort of a modern-esque feel.
Also, most of the type is bigger. Simple. I asked my friend Cheryl about the sites readability. She admitted that she often has to zoom the page to be most comfortable reading. Not good. I had suspected that it was a little small, so I bumped everything up.
And finally, because of the white background, I felt a little more comfortable increasing the variety of colors on the site. Some dark blues, some dark reds. Mostly mouseover stuff. Not too big a deal, but it’s a needed break from the monochrome of the last design.
So that’s it. If you all want to weigh in on the design. Offer tips, reaction, usability stuff, I’m all ears. Comment away.

Maybe you’ve noticed. Maybe this is your first time here. Either way, I’ve gotta tell you how pumped I am about this latest site-redesign. Whooo Hooo!

So first, let me admit that it doesn’t have the same sort of emo-edgar-allan-punk feel that the “black” design had. But I was having some trouble with the site. The white on black text was just too contrasty for me. I’d be reading something, and then look away to a word processing document or something, and I’d still be able to see the image-negative of the text block I’d just read. Not good. Weird and uncomfortable. And I’d also been experimenting with the fonts. Started with an Arial family for most of the black-site’s life, but recently changed to a serif font, Times New Roman. I liked the formality, but it didn’t seem any easier to read. And the font was too small, too. But there were two things that really sold me on that design (Sliding Doors, by Wayne Conner): 1) the sliding image menu at the top of the main page, and 2) the way that pictures really pop off a black ground. I managed to keep the sliding menu with the new design, though.

Have I been thinking about this too much? Maybe. Here’s a list of what I’ve done with this new design:

The background is white. A lot of what I’m trying to think about with this blog is the cultural transition from print-privilege to screen-privilege. The white ground seems a little more familiar. More traditional. There’s going to be plenty that isn’t, so at least there’s something that harkens back to print.

The font is Century Gothic. Cool, eh? I’m not sure if this element is gonna stick, but I really like how clean it is. I’ve read alot about fonts over the years. I’ve always thought that serif fonts are supposed to be easier to read because the serifs visually implied a horizontal line which speeds reading and is more comfortable for the eye. Maybe so. But then I’ve read in quite a few places online that this phenomenon just doesn’t hold true on screens. The resolution of a screen, though improving, is still no where near the fidelity of print type. So the serifs end up doing more harm than good in terms of speed and eye strain. I also just like how simple and clean Century Gothic looks. I think it creates sort of a modern-esque feel.

Also, most of the type is bigger. Simple. I asked my friend Cheryl about the sites readability. She admitted that she often has to zoom the page to be most comfortable reading. Not good. I had suspected that it was a little small, so I bumped everything up.

And finally, there are more colors on the site. Because of the white background, I felt a little more comfortable increasing the variety of colors on the site. Some dark blues, some dark reds. Mostly mouseover stuff. Not too big a deal, but it’s a needed break from the monochrome of the last design.

So that’s it. If you all want to weigh in on the design. Offer tips, reaction, usability stuff, I’m all ears. Comment away.

This article has 1 Comment

  1. Love it! I have to admit a strong dislike of white on black because of the weird negative image thing you mention. This new design makes me want to click through from my RSS aggregator. Nice work, Trauman!

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