Book Review: The Book on the Bookshelf (Petroski, 1999)

The Book on the Bookshelf by Henry Petroski My rating: 4 of 5 stars [via @trauman] The first half of this book focuses on the co-evolution of the physical/material form of the book (from tablet to scroll to codex) and the way Western culture has fostered access to this form. They evolve in tandem. Really informative. Very clearly written. Should be great resource for my dissertation: shows how objects must…

July 7, 2011
Read More >>

Book Review: The Book on the Bookshelf (Petroski, 1999)

The Book on the Bookshelf by Henry Petroski My rating: 4 of 5 stars [via @trauman] The first half of this book focuses on the co-evolution of the physical/material form of the book (from tablet to scroll to codex) and the way Western culture has fostered access to this form. They evolve in tandem. Really informative. Very clearly written. Should be great resource for my dissertation: shows how objects must…

July 7, 2011
Read More >>

The iPad’s Ironic Disintegration of the Book

The iPad is changing. Getting faster. Cameras. New toggles. Editing software. More and more, this little tablet is transitioning from a consumption-prioritized device to a production-prioritized device. Granted, the transition has only just begun. I’ve got my own criticisms of Apple: their treatment of developers, content providers, etc. And then there’s the way they’ve handled the cameras on the iPad. They could have had cameras on the first model. And…

April 4, 2011
Read More >>

More reflections on the history of predicting the book’s demise.

“The Book” has been dying for a long time. Although I don’t have any actual data to back this up, I sense that the cultural propensity to predict the the book’s demise is directly proportional to the amount of attention we pay to the adoption of digital technologies. More simply: the more computers we see, the more we thinks books are dying. And arguing (not for, in most cases, but…

September 5, 2010
Read More >>

Blog-to-Book Tools: TnP? Preservation? Portability?

[pullshow] Posted a “test-drive” yesterday of the new Anthologize tool developed, conceptualized, built, hyped (positive connotations-only, please), and released by the “One Week | One Tool” institute funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. It’s a very good tool. Still evolving. With bugs. With hope. Structured to grow. For what it’s worth, I’m impressed. So is that all there is to say about it? Nope. [pullthis]There are three reasons I’m…

August 6, 2010
Read More >>

The @ Symbol as a Material Object (Opens the Door for a Cautionary Tale)

It’s been a week since “MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design … acquired the @ symbol into its collection.” I know, right? WTF? First of all… the @ symbol? And second… MoMA? The “acquisition” was announced a week ago on MoMA’s site, and I’ve been thinking about it ever since. I really don’t know what to make of it. Part of me thinks that it’s a serious “art joke” in…

March 29, 2010
Read More >>

Atemporality: a Viable Historical Orientation?

(This entry is a response I posted to Alex Reid’s post, “Atemporality in the Digital Humanities” on his blog Digital Digs. He’s responding to Bruce Sterling’s talk, “Atemporality and the Creative Artist” as well as Alex Halavais’s post on “worn technologies.” I re-post it here because it helps me think through some of the ways that book-futurists historicize the currently fluid and volatile changes in book-technologies. Mostly, I’ve been coming…

March 1, 2010
Read More >>